Free Things to Do in Greensboro

Greene StatueVisitors to Greensboro have a wide variety of FREE attractions to visit. Three of my favorite free history-related sites are listed below. A visit to these historical sites transports you to the time of the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, and the 1960s Civil Rights movement. Both the Historical Museum and Walkway of History are within walking distance (or a very short car ride) of the Troy-Bumpas Inn Bed & Breakfast. The Guilford Courthouse National Military Park is a 15-minute drive from the inn.

Greensboro Historical Museum  Located in a former church that once served as a Confederate hospital, the Greensboro Historical Museum lets you discover Greensboro history through a wide variety of diverse exhibits. You can follow a timeline of Greensboro history in the Welcome to the Gate City exhibit; learn all about pottery produced in North Carolina at the Jugtown Pottery exhibit, and see one of largest collections of Civil War firearms at the Murphy Confederate firearms collection. The new 8,000 sq. ft. Voices of a City exhibit tells the story of Greensboro from the voices of its residents. The museum shop has a variety of items including children’s items, cookbooks, history books, tee shirts and much more.
Museum Hours: Tuesday to Saturday. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.;  Sunday,  2-5 p.m.
130 Summit Ave.
336-373-2043
www.GreensboroHistory.org

Guilford Courthouse National Military Park  Explore more than 220 acres of historic ground and 28 monuments honoring one of the most pivotal battles of the Revolutionary War where British General Cornwalis fought against Colonial forces led by Natanial Greene, for whom the city of Greensboro is named. Be sure to watch the movie at the visitors center to get a good understanding of the importance of the battle as well as how it was fought. The museum shop has, among other things, a large collection of history books.
Open daily, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
2332 New Garden Road.
336-288-1776
www.nps.gov/guco

 Walkway of History  Located in the area of downtown that was home to the start of the civil rights sit-in movement in the 1960s, you can view sidewalk markers that chronicle six chapters in local African-American history. (The nearby International Civil Rights Museum is not free, but does an excellent job of explaining the history of the sit-ins and progress in civil rights both in the U.S. and internationally.) The sidewalk markers are located in downtown Greensboro at South Elm Street at February One Place.

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