Archive for the ‘Greensboro Bed and Breakfast’ Category

When is a Toboggan Not a Toboggan?

January 6th, 2014 by Judy Horn

tobogganWhen is a toboggan not a toboggan? When it’s on your head. If that sounds confusing, let me explain.

To me, the word “toboggan” has always meant “sled.” If you search Google Images for “toboggan,” you’ll see what I mean. Pictures of long, narrow wooden sleds used for coasting downhill over the snow will appear. Toboggans typically curve upward and backward at the front.

So you can imagine my confusion as a transplant to North Carolina when I started hearing the word “toboggan” used to refer to a knit pull-on hat. I’m not alone. One of our recent guests at the Troy-Bumpas Inn Bed & Breakfast (who had also recently moved to the region) described her utter bewilderment when teachers at her child’s school said that all students going on an upcoming field trip should be sure to pack a toboggan. How, she wondered, were dozens of wooden toboggans going to fit onto the bus?

I’m told you’re most likely to hear “toboggan” used to describe a knit cap in North Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee. The origin of this usage is uncertain, but it seems likely that knit hats worn while tobogganing were “toboggan caps.” At some point the word cap was dropped… and the rest is history.

So, the next time you head out into the cold, think of us here in North Carolina and grab your toboggan – it will keep you warm.


Great Fun — The Greensboro Grasshoppers

July 21st, 2013 by Judy Horn

Greensboro Grasshoppers TM

Baseball has a long history in North Carolina. In 1862, captured Union soldiers played baseball while in a prisoner of war camp in Salisbury, NC. Trivia buffs may recall that Babe Ruth hit his first homerun at an exhibition game in Fayetteville, NC, in 1914. And present day North Carolina is home to eight minor league baseball teams.

Thanks to the movie Bull Durham, possibly the best known of North Carolina’s farm teams is the Durham Bulls, a Triple A affiliate of the Tampa Bay Rays. The names of the other NC minor league teams may not be as familiar, but they certainly are colorful: the Ashville Tourists, the Burlington Royals, the Carolina Mudcats, the Hickory Crawdads, the Kannapolis Intimidators, and the Winston-Salem Dash. Here in Greensboro, the home team is the Greensboro Grasshoppers, a class A affiliate of the Miami Marlins and part of the South Atlantic League.

The Grasshoppers play their games at NewBridge Bank Park, 408 Bellemeade St. Greensboro, a beautiful, modern stadium within walking distance of the Troy-Bumpas Inn Bed & Breakfast. The ballpark opened in 2005 and cost $21.5 million to build. The red brick stadium seats up to 7,499 including 5,300 chair-back seats. Parking is available immediately around the stadium.

Greensboro Grasshopper games are among the best attended in the minors. Minor league baseball games have all the excitement of major league games, but with added fun and at a much lower ticket cost than the majors. Tickets, available online and at the stadium, typically are $6 to $9 each. Pre-game autographs are encouraged. There’s a kid-safe play area for children, private grandstand box seating, plenty of concessions, lawn seating and picnic areas, and special promotions like Thirsty Thursdays (when beer is bargain priced), Family Fundays, Money Off Mondays, and Bingo nights. Every Friday and Saturday when the team is in town, a spectacular fireworks show signals the end of the game.  (A common question at the Troy-Bumpas Inn’s breakfast table on weekends during the baseball season is about what all the booms were about!)

If you’ve never been to a minor league baseball game, add this as another reason to visit Greensboro. We’ll be sure to provide great accommodations at the Troy-Bumpas Inn B&B. To learn more about the Greensboro Grasshoppers, visit their official website.

Tips for Shopping in the Furniture Capital

October 23rd, 2012 by Judy Horn

Here is Greensboro, we are fortunate to live about 20 minutes from the “Home Furnishings Capital of the World.” The enormous multitude of furniture retailers in and around High Point, NC, makes it easy to find places to buy home furnishings.  (For a great list of High Point area stores, visit the High Point  Convention and Visitors Bureau at

The largest of these stores is Furnitureland South in Jamestown, NC. Famous for the gigantic chest of drawers in front, Furnitureland South has 1.3 million square feet of showrooms spread throughout three buildings. Merchandise from about 1,500 manufacturers is displayed in room settings and also grouped by manufacturer. Because Furnitureland South ships furniture anywhere, people come to this area from all over the country to shop for home furnishings.

To successfully shop for home furnishings when you are miles from home takes a little preparation. The following tips will help you choose furnishing that are right for your home.

  • Bring room layouts noting all room measurements including the size and location of doors and windows. Note how high off the floor windows are placed.
  • Take pictures of the current room so you can discuss things you like about the room and things you would like to improve (such as furniture placement).
  • Take photos and bring measurements of any items you plan to keep in the room. Be sure to include sentimental items that are certain to stay in the room that you might want to spotlight.
  • If available, bring samples of existing carpets and fabrics, such as window treatments and upholstery. Take photos as well. Bring color chips of wall colors, or take photos if chips are not available.
  • Bring the dimensions of hallways, doorways and stairways so you can be sure the furniture you select will actually be able to get into the house.
  • Look online and in magazines for inspiration photos of rooms, styles, artwork and patterns that you like and that make you feel good.

To prevent yourself from quickly becoming overwhelmed in a big showplace, work with one of the store’s design consultants. They will discuss your project and identify your goals and budget. Then they will help you find items that match your style and wallet without a lot of dizzying walking around!

Wear comfortable clothes and shoes! If you get hungry and need a break, Furnitureland South has its own café! And, it makes sense to stay somewhere like the Troy-Bumpas Inn Bed and Breakfast where you start the day with a great breakfast and end your long day of shopping with a relaxing whirlpool bath!

When the Civil War Came to the Troy-Bumpas Inn

March 4th, 2012 by Judy Horn

One of the marvelous things about living and visiting the Troy-Bumpas Inn bed and breakfast is that you can stand in rooms that were briefly inhabited by Union officers who were in Greensboro in spring 1865 at the conclusion of the Civil War. Talk about bringing history to life!

We know that Union officers stayed at the Bumpass home and used a second floor room as an office in May and June 1865. And, although the Troy-Bumpas Inn has been renovated several times since being built in 1847, we have layouts of what the original house was like, so we can be fairly precise in determining where a small chapter of Civil War history took place.

The following excerpt from the book Women of Guilford County, North Carolina; A Study of Women’s Contributions 1740-1979 describes an interesting interaction between an officer under the command of General Jacob D. Cox and Frances Webb Bumpass and her children Eugenia, Duella, and Robah. The parlor described is the present-day living room; the officers were staying in the present-day Allah guest room.

Frances Bumpass at midlife“A Sgt. Sweitzer settled his troops in a meadow [also described as the apple orchard] near Frances Webb Bumpass’s home and lodged his officers in a second-story bedroom overlooking the camp. The following morning the Bumpasses had begun their regular morning prayer service when the Yankee officers were heard coming down the stairs to the parlor door. When the officers explained that they too had come from Christian homes, Mrs. Bumpass invited them in, and the family continued their morning services with the army of the occupation standing all around them.”



Boxwood House: Amalgam of Architectural Styles, Near Troy-Bumpas Inn

January 19th, 2012 by Judy Horn

One of the things I enjoy about being innkeeper at the Troy-Bumpas Inn is our neighborhood. The inn is located in Greensboro’s historic College Hill district. Part of the Greensboro College campus is directly behind the inn, and the campus of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) is two blocks west.

Boxwood House

Boxwood House on Mendenhall Street, Greensboro

The Troy-Bumpas Inn is the second oldest home in the neighborhood; another home just two doors to the north on Mendenhall Street comes in as No. 3. This stately home was built in 1859, two years after the Bumpas House was built and just before the Civil War. The home was originally the residence of Rev. Nathan Hunt Daniel Wilson, Presiding Elder of the Raleigh District of the North Carolina Methodist Conference and a leader of the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Rev. Wilson was a trustee of Greensboro College and was also involved in the early formation of Trinity College (which became Duke University), 

Rev. Wilson might not recognize his home if he walked by it today. Originally the home had simple lines appropriate for a member of the clergy. However, in the 1950s, then owner Julian Johnston, who operated a nursing home in the house that he called Boxwood, added a great deal of ornate trim and architectural detail salvaged from Greensboro residences that were being destroyed. Bay windows, eve brackets, finials, and interior features were pulled from the Bellemeade Mansion a short distance away. Gable ornaments were salvaged from the home of W. C. Boren, who had co-owned and operated Pomona Terra Cotta, one of the largest manufacturers of clay pipes and sewer lines in the nation. Windows and doors were recycled from other Greensboro sites. All of these additions remain, and so does the Boxwood name.

Nowadays, Boxwood is a true “painted lady,” a term used for Victorian and Edwardian houses and buildings painted in three or more colors that embellish or enhance their architectural details. Boxwood was designated a Guilford County Landmark in 1990, two years earlier than when the Troy-Bumpas Inn became a Guildford County Landmark.

In the coming months, we’ll post more information about the wonderful homes in the College Hill Historic District, a place the Troy-Bumpas Inn is proud to call home.

Greensboro Neighborhood has Magical Holiday Light Display

December 12th, 2011 by Judy Horn

One of the “must-do” things to experience while in Greensboro for the holidays is to drive through the Sunset Hills neighborhood to see the magical display of lighted Christmas balls. A good place to start viewing is the corner of Madison Avenue and Ridgeway Drive. Most of the homes in the neighborhood participate. The homeowners make Christmas balls by wrapping strings of holiday lights around a chicken-wire base. The first Sunday after Thanksgiving, hundreds of light balls are thrown over branches of trees and then they are all plugged in. The effect of muti-colored balls of light dangling over the streets and yards is magical and wonderful. Thousands of cars drive by during the holiday to view the lights. Everyone is encouraged to leave behind donations of non-perishable food for the local food pantry at several collection sites throughout the neighborhood.

A 2009 YouTube video does a great job of giving you an idea of how cool the neighborhood looks at night. (My photos just don’t do it justice!) The video also tells the story of how this all got started. You can also visit their blog for more information and instructions on how to make Christmas Light ball.

The Christmas Light Balls in the Sunset Hills neighborhood are part of what makes Greensboro special. Come and visit to see for yourself! And, of course, we invite you to stay at the Troy-Bumpas Inn whenever you are in Greensboro, NC.


Why are North Carolinians Tar Heels?

December 3rd, 2011 by Judy Horn

December is the month for parties, so if you’re looking for some ice-breaker trivia, look no further. When the conversation need a little pick-me-up, you can pose the question: ‘Ever wonder why North Carolinians are called Tar Heels? Then, be a smarty pants and tell ’em the story:

The origin of the nickname comes from the fact that North Carolina has an abundance of pine forests that for centuries were our country’s chief source of tar, pitch and turpentine used for painting, caulking and preserving the wood and ropes used in navel and merchant vessels. By 1768, North Carolina produced 60 percent of the colonies’ supply of these three products. Production involved heating pine lumber in charcoal beds to extract and collect a black ooze. This was a messy process that often caused the soles of the workers’ shoes to be coated with tar. Popular legend says that after a Civil War battle in Virginia in which the Virginia troops fled while the North Carolinians stuck to their positions, as if held fast by tar, Confederate General Robert E. Lee is said to have exclaimed, “God bless the Tar Heel boys.”  The story goes on to say that Confederate President Jefferson Davis asked jokingly if there was a surplus of tar available from North Carolina for other commanders to use to smear it on the shoes of their soldiers’ heels to help them hold steadfast against the Union attacks.

While it is unproven that Robert E. Lee actually coined the Tar Heel nickname, he certainly popularized the term and gave it a positive meaning. North Carolinians have been proud to be called Tar Heels ever since.

It’s no surprise that the pine is the state tree of North Carolina. There is a spectacularly tall long needle pine tree in the front corner of the yard at the Troy-Bumpas Inn in Greensboro. While the age of the tree is unknown, it towers over the inn, which is three stories tall. This tree has no doubt been witness to a lot of history. Greensboro is a great city for history buffs. Come see for yourself, and we welcome you to stay at the Troy-Bumpas Inn, 114 S. Mendenhall St., Greensboro, NC.
The tall Troy-Bumpas Inn pine tree

This long needle pine tree
has towered over the Troy-Bumpas Inn
for many years.


October 23rd, 2011 by Judy Horn

Registered guests consent to the following policies.

  • Rates are for one or two people and include a full breakfast each day. Rates are subject to state and local taxes.
  • There is a charge of $30 per person per night for each additional person. Children sleeping in their parents’ room count as additional people. Not all rooms may be available for additional guests. Please consult with the innkeepers.
  • Reservations may be made online at our website at anytime. If you prefer to speak with one of the innkeepers, please call 336-370-1660 or e-mail us at Office hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Eastern Time USA). If calling outside these hours, please leave a detailed message.
  • All cancellations are subject to a $25 processing charge. Cancellation fees will be applied to the credit card used to secure the booking. Guests incur only this cancellation fee if they cancel more than FOUR (4) days before their scheduled check-in date. Guests who cancel at any time during the 4 days prior to 12:01 a.m. (Eastern time zone) on the day of their scheduled check-in are responsible for all room charges unless we can re-book the room(s). For reservations made more than six months in advance, a 30-day cancellation policy applies. You may wish to purchase trip cancellation insurance, offered by AAA and other travel companies.
  • We reserve the right to require a 50% deposit or one night’s lodging on multi-night stays applied to a valid credit card/debit card (MasterCard, Visa or Discover) to obtain a confirmed reservation. The balance is due upon arrival.
  • We accept personal checks drawn on U.S. banks if we receive the check at least 30 days prior to your scheduled arrival.
  • All overseas transactions must be by credit card. Your reservation is not confirmed until you have been contacted by us.
  • Once guests check in, they are responsible for the full quoted cost of their stay. No refunds for early departure.
  • Rates are subject to change without notice. Special events and holidays may have higher prices and may have a minimum stay requirement. We always honor the rate quoted at the time your reservation is confirmed.
  • Corporate rates are for single occupancy and are available Monday through Thursday nights excluding holidays and International Furniture Market dates. You must have proof that you are traveling on local business to get this rate – innkeepers’ discretion. Please contact the innkeepers if you have questions. Corporate cancellation policy is 24 hours.
  • We welcome children aged 12 years and older accompanied by a parent or guardian. We cannot accommodate pets of any sort.
  • So that we can prepare for guests, check-in is between 3 to 6 p.m. Early and late arrivals may be possible if prearranged. Check-out is by 11 a.m.
  • We are a non-smoking inn. Smoking is only permitted outdoors in a designated area and is not permitted on the porches or on the outdoor back stairs. Guests who smoke in the inn may be asked to leave, charged for their full reservation, and will be charged an additional cleaning fee of at least $50.
  • Candles, incense, and any open flames are prohibited in our historic home. (No one wants to be roused out of bed by our very sensitive smoke alarms. Our insurance agent thanks you, too.)
  • Should damage be caused by a guest, the innkeepers reserve the right to charge the credit card on file to remedy the situation.
  • Unless alternative arrangements are made with the innkeepers in advance, we can allow only paid, registered guests on the premises.
  • Guests who use the inn’s Internet service agree not to use the network to gain unauthorized access to any computer systems; to download, display, upload or transmit obscenity or pornography; or illegally download or distribute copyright-protected materials.

The Troy-Bumpas Inn is inspected by the Guilford County Department of Public Health.